Chair: Nadine Jukschat & Dominic Kudlacek

Radicalisation within the digital age - the meaning of new media

Building: G
Room: 22


Author: Mischler Antonia, University of Greifswald, Department of Criminology, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure and Comparative Criminal Law and Justice

Pia Müller, University of Greifswald, Department of Criminology, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure and Comparative Criminal Law and Justice
Title: Same Same, but Different: Extremist Ideologies Online. Salafism/Jihadism and Right-Wing Extremism in Social Media
Social media groups on Facebook, WhatsApp or Telegram allow for direct exchange, communication and interaction, as well as networking of different individuals worldwide. Such groups are also used to spread propaganda and thus allow for self-radicalization or mutual radicalization of their members. In our paper, we will compare communication processes of right-wing extremist and jihadi groups in social media to describe and understand radicalization paths on the internet. It is expected that both groups are united in their enmity against an enlightened, liberal, democratic society that values human rights. This assumption can also be based on the idea that both ideologies, regardless of their differences, are in their core based on group-focused enmity, aiming to degrade certain out-groups while intending to improve the social identity of the in-group. Drawing upon the concept of ideologies of inequality, we will present first comparative results of our study. The analyses are based on communication threads in openly accessible and in clandestine groups on Facebook. The ideological components of such communication processes and the underlying argumentative structures are identified. In our analysis, we focus on specific events, which were relevant for both right-wing extremist and jihadi discourse, and which build a comparative basis for the study. Results also differ depending on the level of radicalization a certain group has already achieved.
Keywords: radicalization process, social media, online communication in extremist groups
Author: Kietzmann Diana, University of Greifswald, Institute of Psychology, Department Health and Prevention

Edzard Glitsch, University of Greifswald, Institute of Psychology, Department Health and Prevention & Silke Schmidt, University of Greifswald, Institute of Psychology, Department Health and Prevention
Title: Efficacy of Radicalizing Cues
It is recognised that the World Wide Web offers radical groups new opportunities as the corresponding propaganda is accessible to broad sections of the population. The effects of propaganda provided by the World Wide Web on different groups at risk for radicalization, however, have been poorly studied up to now. The study carried out by the Institute of Psychology, University of Greifswald explores which potentially radicalizing graphical cues (pictures material from relevant websites) have an effect on different groups at risk for radicalization. Effectiveness of the potentially radicalizing cues is understood as level of awareness and as cognitive, emotional and behaviour-related reactions as well as the subjectively perceived attractiveness of the potentially radicalizing graphical cues. The methodological access is innovative as it contains methods of self-disclosure and implicit attitude measurement (Implicit Association Test) as well as Eye-Tracking as an additional method. At the presentation, preliminary results of the study will be presented.
Keywords: online propaganda, implicit attitude measurement, eye-tracking
Author: Vernocchi Simonetta, European Institute of Forensics and biomedical science

Andreas
Title: The roots of violence between terrorism and religious extremism
The recent events of massacres and attacks are bound to reflect on the reasons for so much hatred and violence masquerading as religious war. Many have worked to challenge a sociological, historical, economic, cultural and political reading at these events. Often the authors of the massacres are ""poor"" people, both culturally and economically, forced to the margins of society, with nothing to lose, to be blown up is a way to achieve immortality, to have a place in history. Then we read that some of the authors of the massacres are educated people, rich, healthy, young, with a good job, a seemingly normal family, with young children, with a future. Within a people, religion represents an element of formidable cohesion: it fosters a sense of belonging and brotherhood among people.
Keywords: terrorism, disdain, violence, religion, culture
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